Low Expectations for new UN Agency, UN Women.

In what appears to be an unusual effort to reduce (!) bureacracy, the UN General Assembly recently voted unanimously to merge four previously distinct parts of the UN system that focus exclusively on gender equality and women’s empowerment into a new agency simply called UN Women.

Specifically, the merger consists of these parts: Division for the Advancement of Women (DAW), International Research and Training Institute for the Advancement of Women (INSTRAW), Office of the Special Adviser on Gender Issues and Advancement of Women (OSAGI), and United Nations Development Fund for Women (UNIFEM).

In what appears to be an unusual effort to reduce (!) bureacracy, the UN General Assembly recently voted unanimously to merge four previously distinct parts of the UN system that focus exclusively on gender equality and women’s empowerment into a new agency simply called UN Women.

Specifically, the merger consists of these parts: Division for the Advancement of Women (DAW), International Research and Training Institute for the Advancement of Women (INSTRAW), Office of the Special Adviser on Gender Issues and Advancement of Women (OSAGI), and United Nations Development Fund for Women (UNIFEM).

Why is the West financing the Human Rights Council?

Below is my translation of a column that featured in Danish daily newspaper Berlingske Tidende on May 14th 2010. The column is written by Jacob Mchangama who is chief legal officer in the liberalistic think-tank CEPOS based here in Copenhagen. Jacob Mchangama is a certified lawyer and, furthermore, has a Master’s degree in human rights’ studies.

Below is my translation of a column that featured in Danish daily newspaper Berlingske Tidende on May 14th 2010. The column is written by Jacob Mchangama who is chief legal officer in the liberalistic think-tank CEPOS based here in Copenhagen. Jacob Mchangama is a certified lawyer and, furthermore, has a Master’s degree in human rights’ studies.

First Annual CEPOS Conference on Human Rights

Fresh back from the first annual CEPOS conference on human rights I just want to upload some pictures from the event where I duly noted that the introductory programme contained quotes from a report I had supplied chief legal officer Jacob Mchangama with a few days ago.

The topic: Should the UN continue to be liberal democracies primary forum for the protection and propagation of human rights?

Occasion: OIC’s full frontal attack on freedom of speech at the Human Rights Council.

Durban Review Conference still a sham

So Denmark participates in the Durban Review Conference set to last April 20-24th 2009. Yesterday the Foreign Ministry announced that Denmark would go along with the majority of nations in EU and apparently that means we are going. Not a very principled stance if you ask me.

Whereas EU unity on any kind of foreign policy issue would be preferable, weighing that illusion over the very real prospect of giving in to various oppressive regimes’ idea of human rights is very worrying indeed.

OIC takes fight against freedom of speech to the UN

The Durban Review Conference a.k.a. Durban II may not have created many headlines outside the blogosphere and NGO web-sites yet but represents in fact one of the most important battlegrounds in the ongoing facedown between Western style democracy and freedom on one side and Islam plus various other kinds of fascism on the other. This time the Islamists have hijacked the UN to further their cause.

Previous optimism by the International Humanist and Ethical Union (IHEU) was most likely premature. On the 25th of November 2008 the UN General Assembly passed (85 votes in favour to 50 against, with 42 abstentions) a (document A/C.3/63/L.22/Rev.1) a draft resolution on combating defamation of religions, which will form the basis of the votes at the Durban II conference in April 2009.